The Civil War Connections Blog

Author Archives: Kelly

Senior at Christopher Newport University, studying History and English Literature. Favorite areas of history are Civil War America, World War II and assorted European histories, as well as the consideration of memory of historical events. One of the Mariners’ Museum’s most recent addition to the intern bloggers.

Protecting History

As I approach graduation, I seem to be continuously fielding questions about my major in undergrad, and my career goals. Usually when I say that I’ve studied history and wish to work in museums, I get the glazed eyes and the confused, “why?” which usually sounds more like “why on Earth would you want to […]

The Other President

When thinking about the Civil War, I find it interesting to consider that there were two American governments operating at the same time. They were fighting one another desperately and had some important differences, but much of the Confederacy was modeled after the set up of the United States. They both had Cabinet members, Constitutions […]

Code Name: “Flamingo”

Hello faithful Connection followers! I hope everyone is enjoying some nice spring weather, and not suffering from allergies. I believe I hinted to this last week, but today I’m going to discuss the Secret Service. I think I tell you every time I do a blog that it’s topic is something of interest to me, […]

The First Assassination

So, if you haven’t already been able to tell, I find Abraham Lincoln one of the most fascinating presidents that we have ever had.  For Christmas I received two books on Lincoln, and for my birthday I received a copy of the new Lincoln movie that I discussed in a blog a long time ago. […]

Waving the White Flag

On this day, April 9th, 148 years ago Confederate General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia laid down their weapons and surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant in the small town of Appomattox, Virginia. Almost exactly four years before, on April 12, 1861, the Confederates had begun shooting on Fort Sumter, […]

I-295, Exit 31: Cold Harbor

When driving to and from school, I always note the number of battlefields I pass. There’s Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville up along I-95 in Northern Virginia, and when I hit I-295 outside of Richmond, I always note the sign for Cold Harbor. Due to its central location and the fact that Washington D.C. was caught between […]

Women in the War, pt. 2

Hello faithful Connections readers! Today covers part two of my series on women during the war, and discusses women spies! During the Civil War, women received a substantial amount of power as a result of the men being required to leave home and engage in battle. The lack of a male presence within the household […]

Women in the War, pt. 1

Prior to the Civil War, women in the United States of America had a clearly defined role within society. For the majority of women, this meant remaining in the private sphere and caring for their families. Even one of our founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson, believed that the role of women was to “sooth and calm […]

Medal of Honor

Prior to the start of the Civil War, there was no medal to recognize the outstanding efforts and bravery of the members of the armed forces. It was first introduced as a bill within the Senate by Iowa Senator James W. Grimes, in December 1861. This first bill focused on a medal just for members […]

Ironclad Legends

In early March of 1862, the ironclad ships of both the Confederacy and the Union finally encountered one another and engaged in a naval battle that would forever change naval technology. Even at the time, back in 1862, many people understood that this one encounter was a monumental event. Amazingly enough, one of the perks […]