The Civil War Connections Blog

Category Archives: poetry

” A startling knell from Hatteras’ shore….”

Having spent a glorious few hours now researching the public response to the sinking of the Monitor, I chanced upon this little gem. Enjoy! From the Boston Daily Advertiser, Saturday, February 14, 1863 – Issue 53, page 2, column F [For the Boston Daily Advertiser.] The Monitor. I. Hail and farewell, O, Monitor! A startling […]

“Once mistress of the seas…”

In the same book we mentioned here, an anonymous poet penned this little ditty about the USS Cumberland as well. Enjoy! THE CUMBERLAND – anonymous Magnificent thy fate! Once mistress of the seas; No braver vessel ever flung A pennon to the breeze; No bark e’er died a death so grand; Such heroes never vessel […]

“Shall we give them a broadside, my boys, as she goes?”

Inspired by the reports of the bravery of the USS Cumberland‘s crew against the might of the CSS Virginia on March 8, 1862 – and by the words supposedly uttered by Lt. George Upham Morris even as his ship was sinking beneath the waves, poet Elizabeth T. Porter Beach wrote the following lines sometime in […]

‘The spectral blue lights rose in vain…’

The January 24, 1863 issue of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper carries the story of the Monitor‘s sinking on the front page. But buried within the issue was also the following poem. What I find interesting is that part two deals with the search that ensued after the sinking. There is no author listed – likely […]

…the whole land resounds with ERICSSON!

From time to time we come across new…old poetry about the Monitor and Virginia.  Today, we found this. The entire poem is extremely long and deals with all of the events of 1862. But the piece about the Battle of Hampton Roads was particularly nice:   Excerpt from New Year’s Address of the Carriers of the Providence […]

Brawned like Briareus….and whatnot

A review of Palmetto Pictures by Volney Hickox and published by Walter Low appeared in the  New York Evening Post 163 years ago this day.  While I would normally just give such a review a cursory glance – the following made me stop and reconsider.  Of this work the reviewer writes: “This purports to be a poem, devoted […]

The response…..

From Harper’s Weekly, January 24, 1863   THE MONITOR.   Oh loyal souls, sunk in a noble ship As e’er the waters crossed! What direful tidings ring from every lip— “The Monitor is lost!” Sunk in an instant underneath the wave, With half the crew lost in a watery grave.   And yet not lost. Within […]

Winter

From the December 20, 1862 Harper’s Weekly   WINTER. When winter rains begin, And trees are yellow and thin, And every garden bed Is a couch for the dying or dead; When woods are mouldy and dank; When the sodden river bank Is gusty, and misty, and chill, And birds are dull and still; Then may you […]

another poetic interlude

We found this little editorial gem in the March 22, 1862 edition of Vanity Fair (page 148, to be precise).   Steel Fixings For Ever! The charm is broke of “Heart of Oak”                 Our ancient naval friend. And Iron we sing, of metals king,                 That shot nor shell can rend. Ensheathed in steel, from […]