The Civil War Connections Blog

Monthly Archives: February 2013

Jackson

A few weeks ago I posted about the role the United States Military Academy at West Point played in supplying both the Union and the Confederacy with many of its leaders, pitting classmate against classmate. The West Point class of 1846 produced a number of Civil War leaders, including George B. McClellan, George E. Pickett […]

The Civil War for Kids

I realize now after reviewing what I blogged about last week, that neither one was really a mood enhancing blog post. I know I promised something more uplifting after kicking the week off with Andersonville Prison, but then I cheated and posted some fascinating photos of the battlefield dead. I hope that today’s discussion of […]

Capturing the War

When I was a junior and a senior in high school, I was able to take three extra elective courses in addition to my required classes. I had already filled two of these spaces with a choir class and an extra history class (there is really no exaggeration when I say I’m a history nerd), […]

Memorializing Northern Aggression

As I was walking into work today, I encountered my supervisor on her way to a meeting. She asked what I was planning on writing about today, and when I replied that I was writing about Andersonville Prison, she chuckled and said how uplifting that would be. I replied that it was a shame I […]

Coming Home

  December 31, 1862. As the rest of the divided nation was preparing for a new year, and to hopefully end the Civil War, the crew of the USS Monitor was fighting for their lives. After getting caught in a storm as they traveled south to Beaufort, North Carolina, the Monitor sank sixteen miles off […]

Mrs. Lincoln

When thinking about the Civil War and the White House, many people immediately think of Abraham Lincoln, one of our nation’s most famous presidents. Few people consider the woman who stood beside him through one of the most trying presidential terms in our history. Mary Todd Lincoln, a native of Lexington, Kentucky, when discussed, is […]

That We Here Highly Resolve

  Today marks what would be President Abraham Lincoln’s 204th birthday, and in honor of our 16th President, you get a two-for-one deal with blog posts today! In addition to this little refresher on President Lincoln, I will also be posting a more in-depth look at his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln. As I’m sure most […]

Defending D.C.

  Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, Washington D.C. stood largely undefended. With the exception of Fort Washington, located south of the capitol on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, the population of 63,000 in Washington was exceptionally vulnerable. With the secession of Virginia from the Union, and Maryland as an unsteady […]