The Civil War Connections Blog

Tag Archives: Confederate

Protecting History

As I approach graduation, I seem to be continuously fielding questions about my major in undergrad, and my career goals. Usually when I say that I’ve studied history and wish to work in museums, I get the glazed eyes and the confused, “why?” which usually sounds more like “why on Earth would you want to […]

The First Assassination

So, if you haven’t already been able to tell, I find Abraham Lincoln one of the most fascinating presidents that we have ever had.  For Christmas I received two books on Lincoln, and for my birthday I received a copy of the new Lincoln movie that I discussed in a blog a long time ago. […]

Waving the White Flag

On this day, April 9th, 148 years ago Confederate General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia laid down their weapons and surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant in the small town of Appomattox, Virginia. Almost exactly four years before, on April 12, 1861, the Confederates had begun shooting on Fort Sumter, […]

I-295, Exit 31: Cold Harbor

When driving to and from school, I always note the number of battlefields I pass. There’s Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville up along I-95 in Northern Virginia, and when I hit I-295 outside of Richmond, I always note the sign for Cold Harbor. Due to its central location and the fact that Washington D.C. was caught between […]

Front Row Seats to the Eastern Theater

Some of my favorite stories of the Civil War are the ones about events of pure coincidence. One of these stories is the tale of Wilmer McLean, and his poor choice of housing for himself and his family. In 1853, McLean and his wife Virginia Beverly Hooe Mason moved into a rural area west of […]

The Civil War for Kids

I realize now after reviewing what I blogged about last week, that neither one was really a mood enhancing blog post. I know I promised something more uplifting after kicking the week off with Andersonville Prison, but then I cheated and posted some fascinating photos of the battlefield dead. I hope that today’s discussion of […]

Memorializing Northern Aggression

As I was walking into work today, I encountered my supervisor on her way to a meeting. She asked what I was planning on writing about today, and when I replied that I was writing about Andersonville Prison, she chuckled and said how uplifting that would be. I replied that it was a shame I […]

Defending D.C.

  Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, Washington D.C. stood largely undefended. With the exception of Fort Washington, located south of the capitol on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, the population of 63,000 in Washington was exceptionally vulnerable. With the secession of Virginia from the Union, and Maryland as an unsteady […]

Black Knight vs. Black Knight

Founded during the Revolutionary War at the urging of General George Washington, the fortress at West Point, NY, has stood guard over the Hudson River since its construction in 1778. The fort officially became the United States Military Academy in 1802, and has since been producing officers well versed in military leadership and a variety […]