The Civil War Connections Blog

Tag Archives: George Geer

…my Liver is out of order….

There was probably nothing more miserable than being on board an iron ship in the middle of the James River in the summertime. But if you were sick….that made it even worse. Fireman George Geer of the USS Monitor apparently drank some of the brackish water from the James and suffered the consequences….. James River July […]

From those who were there……

Key: John Bankhead, Captain, USS Monitor Samuel Dana Greene, Executive Officer, USS Monitor William Keeler, Acting Assistant Paymaster, USS Monitor Grenville Weeks, Acting Assistant Surgeon, USS Monitor Joseph Watters, Second Asst. Engineer, USS Monitor George Geer, Fireman, USS Monitor David Ellis, Paymaster’s Steward, USS Monitor Francis Butts, Landsman, USS Monitor Stephen D. Trenchard, Commander, USS […]

The Last Voyage of the USS Monitor

On Christmas Eve 1862, orders came in for the USS Monitor to proceed to Beaufort, North Carolina, then presumably to Charleston, though it was not stated in the orders.[1] On Christmas Day, both officers and crew observed the holiday with both work and festive food and drink. Some of the crew had leave to go […]

“…as regards Christmass…”

Three men on board the USS Monitor wrote home about their Christmas on the ironclad. First we’ll hear from an officer:   Paymaster William Keeler December 24 1862 – writing home to his wife, Anna:   Following the call of the Master at Arms at my room with his “six bells” &c last evening came Mr. […]

Monitor Log: 2 September 1862

September 2nd was a grim day on the Monitor.  Sadly, Wardroom Steward Lawrence Murray, whom we met back on March 3rd in an event that did not show him at his best, died on this day. The logbook entry below records the event rather matter of factly. But crewman George Geer went into far more detail in […]

“…a sad finish for such a bright beginning.”

After the fall of Norfolk, the Virginia found herself without a home.  Her commanding officer, Josiah Tattnall was thus faced with a dilemma. If he attempted to attack the Union fleet, he had some hope of destroying several vessels before being sunk, or worse, captured. He rejected this plan because of the risk of being […]