The Civil War Connections Blog

Tag Archives: Maryland

The First Assassination

So, if you haven’t already been able to tell, I find Abraham Lincoln one of the most fascinating presidents that we have ever had.  For Christmas I received two books on Lincoln, and for my birthday I received a copy of the new Lincoln movie that I discussed in a blog a long time ago. […]

Defending D.C.

  Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, Washington D.C. stood largely undefended. With the exception of Fort Washington, located south of the capitol on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, the population of 63,000 in Washington was exceptionally vulnerable. With the secession of Virginia from the Union, and Maryland as an unsteady […]

Remembering Emancipation

Hello folks, and welcome back to the Connections blog! In today’s society, Abraham Lincoln is often remembered as not only one of our most popular presidents, but as the president who freed the slaves. The popular conception is that Abraham Lincoln, using the Emancipation Proclamation, freed the slaves and ended slavery during the Civil War. […]

How Emancipation Changed the War

Hey there, folks, and welcome back to the Connections blog! Today, I want to discuss the Emancipation Proclamation and how it forever altered our memory of what the Civil War was fought over. Before the Emancipation Proclamation was made public on September 22nd, the purpose of the Union’s side was to quash the rebellion and […]

Reenactors’ Memory

Howdy folks, and welcome back to the Connections blog! I have a special treat in store for you… a two part posting on Civil War reenacting and how it deals with Civil War memory! This past Monday, the nation remembered the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam (or Battle of Sharpsburg in the south.) […]