The Civil War Connections Blog

Tag Archives: Virginia

The First Assassination

So, if you haven’t already been able to tell, I find Abraham Lincoln one of the most fascinating presidents that we have ever had.  For Christmas I received two books on Lincoln, and for my birthday I received a copy of the new Lincoln movie that I discussed in a blog a long time ago. […]

I-295, Exit 31: Cold Harbor

When driving to and from school, I always note the number of battlefields I pass. There’s Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville up along I-95 in Northern Virginia, and when I hit I-295 outside of Richmond, I always note the sign for Cold Harbor. Due to its central location and the fact that Washington D.C. was caught between […]

Jackson

A few weeks ago I posted about the role the United States Military Academy at West Point played in supplying both the Union and the Confederacy with many of its leaders, pitting classmate against classmate. The West Point class of 1846 produced a number of Civil War leaders, including George B. McClellan, George E. Pickett […]

Defending D.C.

  Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, Washington D.C. stood largely undefended. With the exception of Fort Washington, located south of the capitol on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, the population of 63,000 in Washington was exceptionally vulnerable. With the secession of Virginia from the Union, and Maryland as an unsteady […]

Black Confederate Soldiers: Fact or Fantasy? (Part 1)

Hey there folks, and welcome back to the Connections blog! To begin today’s two-part topic, I shall tell to you an awkward personal story. When I was visiting a large, outdoor living history museum in Virginia last year (a museum that shall remain nameless and had nothing to do with the Civil War), I overheard […]

The Hispanic Experience

Hey there, folks, and welcome back to the Connections blog! As you kind readers have no doubt surmised by following this blog, the Civil War was fought by social and ethnic groups of all kinds. One of the largest ethnic groups that are often overlooked in the conflict is the Hispanic population. Heavily concentrated in […]

How Emancipation Changed the War

Hey there, folks, and welcome back to the Connections blog! Today, I want to discuss the Emancipation Proclamation and how it forever altered our memory of what the Civil War was fought over. Before the Emancipation Proclamation was made public on September 22nd, the purpose of the Union’s side was to quash the rebellion and […]

A New Topic: Civil War Memory

Howdy folks, and welcome back to the Connections blog. I am sad to say that I will be discontinuing the brief “today’s tidbit about me” section at the beginning of the post. This is because I’ll be focusing my posts on a more serious, specific scope of topics this fall – specifically, the issue of […]

So Fill to Me the Parting Glass

Hey there folks, and welcome back to the good ol’ blog! Today’s tidbit about me is: sadly, today is the last day of my internship with The Mariners’ Museum. I have worked not only on your favorite Connections blog, but also on several artifacts and the Library’s Port of Call blog. Although I shall return […]

Drawn Conflict

Hello folks, and welcome back to the good ol’ blog! Today’s tidbit about me is: I have a soft spot (nay, a weakness) in my heart for cookies. When I’m feeling sad and lonely, there’s a service they can render… I’ve told the ones who love me, only they can be so warm and tender… […]