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IntroductionDepartureMiddle PassageArrivalAbolitionLegacy

Captive Passage: The Transatlantic Slave Trade and the Making of the Americas

Captive Passage
has been made
possible in part by:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Recognition of
additional sponsors
for this exhibition
can be found by
clicking on
ExhibitionSponsors.

Middle PassageSailing and StormsStowageIllness and Death
Ships and CrewsProvisionsEnduring the Middle PassageResistance

Sailing and Storms

Crews and slaves alike feared storms at sea, but the experience must have been far more terrifying for those chained below deck. One Danish slaver, the Kron Printzen, sank in a storm in 1706 with more than 800 slaves on board. In 1738 the Dutch slaver Leuden became stranded off Surinam during a storm. To prevent panic, the crew locked the hatches to the slave decks and abandoned ship. More than 700 Africans drowned.


Continue to:
Stowage