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Lighthouses on the Chesapeake Bay

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Sharps Island Lighthouse, southwest of Tilgman Island, Chesapeake Bay
Sharps Island Lighthouse, southwest of Tilgman Island, Chesapeake Bay
Sharps Island Lighthouse, Southwest of Tilgman Island, Chesapeake Bay (built 1838)The lighthouse was established in 1838 and a new screwpile light was built in 1866 because of severe erosion around Tilgman Island. This lighthouse was moved in February 1881 by an ice floe. The lighthouse keepers held on to the sides for six hours until the light ran aground. A concrete-filled caisson light was built, and is still standing, but at a tilt. Another series of ice floes in the 1970s caused the light to tilt fifteen degrees. The glass lens was replaced with a plastic one and the light is in a state of decay.
Point No Point Lighthouse, with Tender Holly, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Point No Point Lighthouse, with Tender Holly, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Point No Point Lighthouse, with Tender Holly, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland (built 1905)

This lighthouse was first proposed in 1891 for site in the main north-south ship channel of the Chesapeake Bay. During the early stages of construction of this lighthouse, the construction pier collapsed and the caisson broke and drifted for forty miles. A contractor's tug retrieved the caisson after it finally came to rest forty miles away along the Rappahannock River. Construction was completed in 1905. The light was automated in 1938 and has been unmanned since 1962. The last keepers were Coast Guardsmen who were well known for their cooking abilities.

Turkey Point Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Turkey Point Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Turkey Point Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland (built 1833)

This cone-shaped lighthouse at the entrance to the Elk River holds two distinctions: it is the tallest lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay and it had more female keepers than any other lighthouse on the Bay. Appointed by President Calvin Coolidge, Mrs. Fannie Salter was the last woman to tend the lighthouse (1925-1947) and the last woman keeper on the entire Bay. After she retired in 1947, the light was fully automated and is currently located in Elk Neck State Park, Maryland. Over the years irreparable damage has occurred to the light.

Read more about Fannie Salter
www.mariner.org/exhibits/women/lighthouse/fannie.htm

Pooles Island Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Pooles Island Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Pooles Island Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland (built 1825)

Pooles Island, named by Captain John Smith for one of his crew members, Nathaniel Powell, is one of the Chesapeake Bay's oldest lighthouses. Built in 1825, it was turned over to the U.S. Army in 1917 as part of the Aberdeen Proving Grounds. The keeper's house has been torn down and the light is in poor condition.

Baltimore Lighthouse, Baltimore, Maryland
Baltimore Lighthouse, Baltimore, Maryland
Baltimore Lighthouse, Baltimore, Maryland (built 1908)

The last lighthouse built on the Chesapeake Bay the Baltimore Lighthouse was built at the entrance to Baltimore Harbor on the west side of the north end of the Chesapeake Bay. Construction took four years because of engineering problems and bad weather. The first attempt to sink the caisson into the mud caused the light to tip over. It was not completed until 1908. In 1964, the Baltimore light was the first atomic-powered lighthouse, but the reactor was removed two years later. The last repairs made on the light were in 1989-90.

Craighill Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Craighill Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
Craighill Lighthouse, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland (built 1873)

Craighill Lighthouse was one of three range lighthouses built near Baltimore Harbor. The rear light depicted in the photograph shows the keeper's quarters at the base of the light tower.

 

 

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