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Strachey's A Dictionarie of the Indian Language

Smith's Vocabulary of Indian words

Weroances and Their Tribes

English Observers

William Strachey' s Description of Critters in the Chesapeake Bay

Henry Spelman, Relation of Virginia, 1609

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William Strachey' s Description of Critters in the Chesapeake Bay

Shaddes, of a yard long, and for sweetnes and fatnes a reasonable good fish, he is only full of small bones.

Grampus, porpois, seales, stingraies, bretts, mullets, white salmons, trout, soles, playse, comfish, rockfish, eeles, lampreys, cat-fish, perch of three sorts, shrimp, crefishes, cockles, mushells, and more such like, like needles[s] to name, all good fish.

There is a garfish [a species of belone] some of which are a yard long, small and round like an eele, and as big as a man's leg, having a long snout full of sharp teeth.

Oysters there be in whole bancks and beds, and those of the best I have seene some thirteen inches long. The savages use to boyle oysters and mussels together, and with the broath they make a good spoone meat, thickened with the flower of their wheat; an yt is a great thrit and husbandry with them to hang the oysters upon strings (being shaul and dried.) in the smoake, thereby to preserve them all the yeare.

There be two sorts of sea crabs, and the one our people call a king king crabb, and they are taken in shoall waters from off the shore a dozen at a tyme hangingone upon another's tails; they are of a foote in length and half a foote in bredth, having manie leggs an a long tayle; the Indians seldom eat of this king.


 

 

 

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