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Harvesting the Bounty

Fishing

Pound Net Fishing
Pound Net Fishing
Commercial fishermen use nets, not fishing poles. There are several different types of nets.

The oldest type of net used by the watermen is called a pound net. Wooden stakes are pushed into the bottom of the Bay, spaced apart in a line that runs across the tide. Nets are strung between the stakes and along the bottom of the river, making a fish trap. In late February the pound netter starts to put in the stakes. By the middle of March he will set his nets and start fishing. Each day the waterman goes out to the pound net and scoops the fish out with a hand net. He will not remove the pound net, except for many repairs, until November.

Pound net fishing
Pound net fishing
The pound nets will trap anything that moves through them, all types of fish and even crabs and eels.
Because a waterman catches a variety of seafood he is continually repairing his nets, crab pots, and boat.
Because a waterman catches a variety of seafood he is continually repairing his nets, crab pots, and boat.

A fyke net is used in rivers and shallow waters. The large "mouth" of the net is pointed up stream and the net continually gets smaller as it gets longer. One waterman can install this type of net, where as it takes more than one person and small boats to install a pound net. The fyke catches fish as well as eels and the shape is one used around the world.


Continue to: Menhaden Fishing

 

 

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