Way Back Wednesdays

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Today’s Way Back photos take us to the early days of this park.  This image (from June 19, 1934) shows the house where our fantastic librarian, Cerinda Evans, lived.  The house was owned by the museum.  Cerinda was our first librarian and, by all accounts, an incredibly smart woman.  She wrote a number of books, including a biography of Shipyard founder, Collis Potter Huntington.

Going back to June 20, 1930, this shows the museum farm, on the property that is now Riverside Hospital.  The idea of maintaining a working farm was abandoned by 1935.   Read more

Way Back Wednesday

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Drum & Bugle Corps performing in Harvey Field, Brayton-Perkins Post, 07-21-1957 (1)

These first two pictures show the Drum and Bugle Corp, Braxton-Perkins Post, performing in Harvey Field, July 21, 1957

Model demonstration on Lake Maury, June 3, 1979.  I’m not sure the last time we had models on the lake, but it wasn’t so long ago that we used to host model-making competitions.   Read more

Fun Fact Friday – Museum Building

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original location of museum

After our charter was put into place in June of 1930, a lot of exciting plans were made for our property.  As cultivation began on the park, lake, and dam (Lion’s Bridge), plans were also being drawn up for the proposed museum building.

The above image (dated February 27, 1931) shows the spot where the founders had originally intended for the main museum building to placed.  It was a spot on Lake Maury overlooking Lion’s Bridge and the James River.  Several plans and sketches were drawn up showing an impressive, rectangular building.   Read more

Way Back Wednesday

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Robeson House 01-20-1932 (3)

This large house belonged to Edward John Robeson, Jr., an employee at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company who went into politics upon his retirement from the shipyard.  This image was taken January 20, 1932.  The house stood on a hill overlooking Lake Maury, Kettle Pond, and the James River, where the statue “Conquering the Wild” by Anna Hyatt Huntington now stands.

In August of 1934 the beautiful house was torn down to make way for the statue.   Read more

Way Back Wednesdays

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Library Interior January 15, 1935

Instead of Throw Back Thursdays, here at The Mariners’ Museum we have decided to do Way Back Wednesdays (we have too many Thursday events to do the former).  I posted several photographs last month that showcased our objects and park, so most of my photos this month (all but one) will show you what the interior of our great institution used to look like.

These first two images show what our library used to look like.  The one on the left shows the general library space in January 15, 1935 with tables for researchers in the center among the books.  The setup is a bit different now as visitors to the library can no longer do research among the general collection, but in the research room outside of the collection.  Our library is also no longer located on our campus, but about a mile away on the Christopher Newport University Campus, which helps it to be a great resource for researchers and students.  The second image is from 1953 and shows the card catalog room (with ladies that have so obviously been staged, hah!).  Our library is a fantastic resource as it holds the largest maritime history collection in the Western Hemisphere.  Click HERE to check out more about the library.   Read more