Way Back Wednesdays

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I’ve posted a number of model shop images through the years, but these two recently came to my attention as I was doing some research for a descendant of the man pictured, John Bader.  The first image is Bader’s personnel photo taken in October 1935.  The second is Bader working on the model of El Sud in early 1934.  The model is now on display in our Ship Model Gallery.  Bader worked in the model shop at least until 1939 as we have images of him up to that point.

This image from July of 1933 shows children looking at the lake through the trees.  It seems very peaceful.   Read more

Way Back Wednesdays

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9-Old Small Craft Bldg

Construction of our old Small Craft Building.  About 11 years ago it was replaced with a newer, more efficient building where a good amount of our small craft is now displayed.

This image shows men in our ship model shop repairing a group of our figureheads on January 23, 1940.  Many of our figureheads came to the museum in rough shape and so needed a bit of work to make sure that they were stable enough to be displayed.  As our old photos show, we used to have a large number of them on the wall of our Great Hall.   Read more

Fun Fact Friday

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Ship Model Shop, January 1937

This month’s fun fact is about our Great Hall of Steam exhibition, which is our gallery that includes many large ship models.  What many may or may not know is that a good number of the models exhibited were built here at the museum.  On July 19, 1932, we opened a ship model shop for the purpose of creating models that could be displayed.

When the work began, they decided to do models of contemporary ships so that the plans from the actual ships could be used.  Most of these ended up being ships that had been built at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company.  The first model the shop started working on was that of President Hoover of the Dollar Line, although a model of the tug John Twohy, Jr. was finished first.   Read more