Using Art Reproductions to Create a Home

Posted on
Vessel rushing through the water against a pink and yellow sky.
#1969.0438.000001

Do you love bold home decor? How about oversized works of art because they can draw focus in your room? Maybe you found they are an excellent way to showcase your personality. Perhaps, you have always wanted to have a gallery wall along your hallway or traveling up the walls of your staircase. Then you know that the choice of artwork placed there should be specific and well planned.

The Dilemma

Making a home sometimes starts in college. I remember my first week on campus; vendors were selling 20” x 30” movie and music posters to help students inject some needed personality into their cookie cutter dorm rooms. For others, it may happen when you decorate your first apartment. You may have purchased your first “art” from Ikea because they sold affordable large-scale art reproductions and inexpensive frames. However, your friends in the same financial situation purchased their framed art from there too. So now your living rooms match because there were not enough unique designs available at the Big Blue box store for everyone.   Read more

New challenges in photomodeling

Posted on
Eagle Stern Carving, front

You know how some days/weeks just do not go the way you thought they were going to? New things pop up, projects that need immediate attention come to the forefront, and the plans you had change. Last week was that way for me, but in the absolute best way!

After a presentation that caught her eye at the recent American Institute of Conservation (AIC) Conference, Paige, the Museum’s Assistant Objects Conservator, approached me with a photo modeling project unlike anything I’ve previously attempted. She is working on a beautiful eagle stern board carving that will soon be going out on loan. To better photo-document the piece, Paige wanted to create an overview shot of the back of the board. Not so complicated, right?   Read more

And we’re off. . .

Posted on
Hannah taking the photos she needs to create the 3D model.

Our spring/summer season is off to a busy start. The week before going into the engine tank, we were in the condenser tank. No cleaning or disassembly took place. This draining was to perform maintenance and examine the artifact. We removed and scrubbed the anode and changed the reference electrodes. The condenser itself is in great shape. See photos below. It is now happily back under electrolytic reduction in a brand new sodium hydroxide solution.

Hannah took a ton of photos and using photogrammetry software was able to create a 3D model of the condenser. It looks fantastic. You can check it out here.   Read more

Photographs of the Photographers

Posted on
Sergeant Joseph Shere photographing three Navy photographers
Sergeant Joseph Shere photographing three Navy photographers

As we work through the HRPE collection, we see many images of the same subject matter – ships, stacks of crates, military vehicles, etc. – so it is always a pleasant surprise when we come across photos of something different. I recently cataloged a few photographs that show a little behind-the-scenes view of the photographers themselves.

While our collection of HRPE photos were taken by the Army Signal Corps photographers, the Navy had their own dedicated photographers. The first image shows Sergeant Joseph Shere of the Army photographing a Navy crew while Captain William R. Wheeler, the Port Historian, takes notes.   Read more

An Oldie, But a Goodie

Posted on
Engine Forward
Monitor’s main steam engine is perched on its treatment rig within the 35,000-gallon treatment tank. The valve chests are visible on the lower left and lower right, reversing gear eccentrics are positioned dead center and top, and the engine’s cast iron support bed spans the entire top portion of this picture.

This week we’ve been very fortunate to spend some quality time with one of our oldest and dearest friends: USS Monitor‘s vibrating side lever steam engine. Much like our favorite ironclad, this salty lady is over 150 years old but keeps looking better every year.

We took the following pictures on Monday. Please remember that the engine currently sits upside down in the treatment tank.   Read more