Additions to the Collection

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Back in the early days of the museum, we received numerous donations of posters from steamship companies, recruiting stations, the shipyard, etc.  We would put one or two of these into the collection and the rest have been sitting around since.  We still have a pile that was never completely cataloged and from time to time (when we have a spare moment) we go through it to see what should be added to the collection and what is duplicate material.  I was moving the pile the other day and came across two beautiful WWI posters that are now going to be added to the collection.

This first poster is from 1917 and was done by artist Henry Reuterdahl (1871-1925), who was born in Malmo, Sweden and emigrated to the United States as a boy.  In 1917 he became a lieutenant in the United States Naval Reserve Force (hence his signature followed by USNRF).  This seems to be one of his most famous pieces and is quite interesting.  It shows an American sailor embracing one from Britain.  To the American’s left are sailors from Japan and France, and to the right from Russia and Italy.   Read more

Posters, part 8

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Thought it was time to share some more posters, so here we go.  The first one is from the 1960’s and encourages young people to stay in school.  As for the second poster, it was an effort to save the old USS Oregon.  The ship was scrapped in the 50’s, but pieces of it remain in the Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland Oregon, including the mast.  The third is a recruiting poster ca 1917 by artist Joseph Christian Leyendecker.

The first poster in this set is also WWI and encourages people to buy victory notes.  The second is WWII by artist Allen Saalburg and works at encouraging patriotism by reminding people of the lives lost in the Pearl Harbor disaster.  The third is also WWII (1944) and stands as a reminder that Americans were also fighting on the Pacific front, not just in Europe where the fighting was coming to a close.  It was done by artist P. Kolada

Posters, part 6

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Our first poster is ca 1917 recruiting poster for WWI, done by artist L.N. Britton.  Keeping with the eagle theme, the second poster is also ca 1917 and was done by artist James Henry Daugherty.  The image is a little dark, but when you see the poster close up the colors are very vibrant and eye-catching.  We have an even larger version of this poster and I love to look it.  The third picture ca 1918 by artist Albert Herter.  I had never seen a YMCA poster this old before, so I thought it was pretty neat.

This second group starts with another WWI era poster, ca 1917.  It clearly is trying to appeal to emotions.  The second poster is from 1917 and encourages people to buy bonds to aid the war effort.  The third is the only WWII poster in this group, being from ca 1944.  This poster was part of a set that warned soldiers/sailors about the dangers of booby traps, encouraging them away from scavenging for souvenirs to take home.  We have quite a lot of these in our collection!

Posters, part 5

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This time we have some posters from WWII era.  The first one encourages those on the home front to work on a farm during the summer for the US Crop Corps so that food can continued to be produced for our troops overseas.  The second one is a bit more startling and implies that Nazi’s are  the enemy and a threat to Christianity.  The third is a piece that came from Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company and encourage the worker’s to keep producing so that the military would have what it needed.

The first one in this grouping also comes from Newport News Shipbuilding and encourages people to carpool to work.  I’ve always enjoyed the rhymes that go along with the Shipyard posters.   The second poster is WWI era and has the pastel colors and imagery that I always find so appealing.  It was done by artist James Montgomery Flagg to help recruit men to the Navy.  The last poster is also a recruiting poster, but from WWII.  I know that Lee is generally thought well of, but it seems weird to see his face on a poster for WWII.  Perhaps this piece was aimed at a particular audience.

Posters, part 4

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A couple of months ago I shared images of posters in our collection.  Photographing all of the posters is one of my goals this year as I know that we have some pretty fantastic ones and it would be great to have updated photographs of all of them.  When the project is completed, the photos will be entered into our database where they will be available to anyone searching our collection online.  I’ve recently been able to work on the project again, so I thought I would share some more posters!

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