Return from conservation

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Painting pre-conservation

Last year I posted about winning money from the Bronze Door Society to conserve my favorite painting in the collection.  Well, I’m happy to say that the painting has now returned from conservation and looks amazing!

Notice how dark the painting was.  It’s difficult to see, but there is a tear on the pyramid, just above the second smoke stack.  The canvas was loose on the stretcher and part of the artist’s signature (as well as people and camel feet) were wrapped around the bottom edge, obscuring them.   Read more

What have you been up to back there?

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One of our more bent stanchions after dry ice cleaning

We have a fantastic corps of volunteers here at the museum. Over the years I’ve been fortunate enough to get to know some of them, particularly the Navigators, who greet visitors, offer tours, and make sure guests find their way to all of the exhibits. Whenever I see them, they never fail to ask how the conservation of the Monitor is going, or if we’ve discovered anything new, or sometimes more generally: what have you been up to back there lately?

So here’s what we’ve been up to lately. . .   Read more

And we’re off. . .

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Hannah taking the photos she needs to create the 3D model.

Our spring/summer season is off to a busy start. The week before going into the engine tank, we were in the condenser tank. No cleaning or disassembly took place. This draining was to perform maintenance and examine the artifact. We removed and scrubbed the anode and changed the reference electrodes. The condenser itself is in great shape. See photos below. It is now happily back under electrolytic reduction in a brand new sodium hydroxide solution.

Hannah took a ton of photos and using photogrammetry software was able to create a 3D model of the condenser. It looks fantastic. You can check it out here.   Read more

A tisket a tasket – I just finished a gasket!

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10 of 15 gaskets from the Starboard Worthington Pump before conservation treatment

This week I thought it might be fun to look at one of our more unusual types of artifacts that I’ve been treating. We have tons (literally) of iron and copper artifacts in the lab, but for every two pipe flanges bolted together, there is also one gasket keeping things tight. The humble gasket can be found throughout the Monitor’s engine room, sandwiched between the copper piping and iron machinery parts. Its job was to keep the fittings air tight and prevent leaks. Most gaskets are made from layers of rubber and textile pressed together, but we do have gaskets made entirely of rubber and a few that are actually leather.

In addition to the gaskets, rubberized fabric, buttons, and combs have also been recovered. Despite the evidence of wide use aboard the Monitor, modern rubber was a relatively new material in 1862. Natural rubber was used before the 1800’s, but due to its unstable nature, it wasn’t suitable for many applications. Thanks to a number of people experimenting with additives and curing processes, more stable forms of rubber became commercially available. For instance, Charles Goodyear (who’s patent is stamped on the Monitor buttons) is credited with patenting vulcanized rubber which is much harder and durable than natural rubber.   Read more

A Thank You to the Bronze Door Society

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5.1.3

On October 28th was the Bronze Door Society annual dinner where museum employees present projects and BDS votes to see who they will fund.  This year we had six excellent project proposals, from purchasing new objects, conserving artifacts already in the collection, and photography equipment.  This was my first year presenting and I was asking for money to conserve my favorite painting, Kaiser Wilhelm II Among the Pyramids.  I won’t go into the history of the ship or painting as you can read about that HERE.

I am thrilled to say that I am one of the three winners of that night and that this amazing painting will finally receive the conservation it deserves!  The piece has been in terrible condition as long as it’s been here and because of this we have been unable to display it.  A big THANK YOU to the Bronze Door Society for their annual dinner and for providing money for projects like mine!  You guys rock!   Read more