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The Mariners' Blog

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  • The documentation, cleaning, and relocation of a 300 year-old ship in pieces

    • Collections
    • Conservation
    • Cultural Heritage

    Ships? Princesses? Dental Picks? Conservation has a lot going on this summer with the documentation, cleaning, and relocation of over 300 ship timbers for future research and treatment.

  • Adventures in outdoor bronze: Conserving Leifr Eiriksson’s statue

    • Art
    • Collections
    • Conservation
    • Mariners' Park

    Have you noticed our Conservation crew treating the Leifr Eiriksson statue this summer? Work is now complete, so read along with us as we share how we cleaned and recoated him!

  • Around the World in Ten Watercraft

    • Collections
    • Cultural Heritage
    • Recreation

    Take a tour of the International Small Craft Center with Jules, one of our summer Conservation interns, as she explores some of her favorite vessels and their stories!

  • Big Bad Sulfur: Using Science to Find a Preventative Treatment

    • Collections
    • Conservation
    • Science

    By building on existing research and conducting new experiments, the team aims to find a way to extract sulfur from waterlogged archaeological wood to prevent future damage.

  • Every good ship captain deserves an attractive octant!

    • Collections

    Extensive research rediscovers history of Dutch ownership for a decorative English octant in the Museum’s Peter Ifland Collection.

  • Dry ice blasting in the tank farm!

    • Conservation
    • Science
    • USS Monitor

    Learn more about what the Monitor Conservation team was up to in the spring, detailing the process we go through when working in the tank farm and treating larger objects!

  • Arromanches + 79: Remembering D-Day

    • Military
    • Military Conflict

    On this 79th anniversary of D-Day landings, remember the sacrifices made for the freedom we continue to enjoy.

  • BEYOND THE FRAME: Forever

    • Art
    • Beyond the Frame
    • Collections

    A mariner, through and through, the artist John Alexander Noble (1913-1983) devoted his life's work to the capture of scenes of mariners at sea, shipping, salvage, and decay. But of all of the ships he captured, in various phases of their life and death, it was the Spanish Bark, Guadalhorce, that he seemed to favor above all others.

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